2017-18 University Catalog 
    
    Aug 17, 2022  
2017-18 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions in this section are reasonable summaries only and are neither completely inclusive nor completely exclusive of total course content for any given course.

Courses listed herein may or may not be offered each term.

Courses are listed alphabetically according to prefix.

Numbering Code

Courses are grouped into a three-digit number series which indicates the normal teaching levels. Some variations may occur.

1-99 Preparatory and Developmental Courses. Courses numbered below 100 are not applicable toward a degree even though units are assigned, grades are awarded and tuition is assessed.

Lower-Division Courses (freshman and sophomore)
100-199 First-Year Courses
200-299 Second-Year Courses

Upper-Division Courses (junior and senior)
300-399 Third-Year Courses
400-499 Fourth-Year Courses

Graduate Courses
500-599 Graduate Courses

Other Codes

Each Term:

Some courses in this section have a code following the course title. This code designates when the course will be offered. F indicates Fall, W indicates Winter, S indicates Spring.

Lecture, Lab, Credit Hours:

The three numbers following the course title. For example:

CST 101 Introduction to Personal Computing
(3-3-4) = weekly lecture hours – lab hours – total credits

For more information, see Baccalaureate General Education Requirements  

Courses with the following notation fulfill the appropriate general education requirements: 
C - Communication H - Humanities HP - Humanities Performance SS - Social Science

Special Terms

As Required: This term designates a course or series of courses which will be offered only as enrollment, student interest, or individual department needs demand and as staffing allows. A course so designated may be offered if special student needs, situations of extreme hardship, or other unusual circumstances deem it in the best interest of both the student(s) and the institution to do so.

Hours to be Arranged Each Term: Normally students negotiate individually with faculty members and/or departments and arrange to have courses so designated offered for the term most suitable to their unique situation.

Corequisite: A course that must be taken simultaneously with another course. Corequisites are noted at the end of each course description.

Prerequisite: A course that must be passed satisfactorily before another course may be taken. Prerequisites are noted at the end of each course description. Courses transferred in to Oregon Tech with a C- or better meet the prerequisite requirement of obtaining a C or better.

Quarter Credit: A credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than:

  1. One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester or trimester hour of credit, or ten to twelve weeks for one quarter hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or
  2. At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution, including laboratory work, internships, practicals, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

A numerical credit value assigned to certain number of lecture or laboratory hours. A lecture class meeting for three 50-minute periods a week would be assigned three units of credit. Students have traditionally been expected to spend an additional six hours of outside class work per week for each three units of lecture class credit. Generally, a lab class requires three hours per week for one unit of credit, or a total of nine in-lab hours with no additional outside class work expected for three units of lab class credit.

Reading and Conference: A course taken on an independent study basis with the supervision of an instructor, usually consisting of weekly conferences, assigned readings, research papers, etc.

Seminar: A class taught by a group discussion process rather than by means of formal lecture. Student research and reporting are usually expected.

Sequence: A series of classes in the same subject area that, taken as a whole, comprise a full year’s work. Generally, course sequences are numbered consecutively, and often (though not always) should be taken in the numerical order listed (i.e., CHE 201  should be taken before CHE 202 , etc.).

 

Electrical Engineering

  
  •  

    EE 535 - Embedded Systems Hardware


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Advanced course in embedded systems hardware design and development. Topics include system-on-chip design, ARM processor architecture, digital signal processors, multicore processing, vector processors, graphics processing units, external serial interfaces, external memory interfaces, network interfaces, debuggers, in-circuit emulators, and hardware security. Cross-listed with EE 435.

    Prerequisite: MSE Graduate standing
  
  •  

    EE 548 - Geometric Optics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Reflection and refraction at plane and curved surfaces; imaging properties of lenses; first order Gaussian optics and thin-lens system layout; matrix optics; ray-tracing software; spherical and chromatic aberrations.

    Prerequisite: PHY 223 
  
  •  

    EE 549 - Radiometry & Optical Detection


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Fundamentals of radiometry and photometry; detection of light using thermal and photon (photoemissive, photoconductive, and photovoltaic) methods; noise processes; blackbodies; charge transfer devices; spectroradiometry.

    Prerequisite: PHY 223 
  
  •  

    EE 550 - Physical Optics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Spherical and planar waves; scalar diffraction theory; Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction and application to measurement; interference and interferometers; optical transfer functions; coherent optical systems and holography.

    Prerequisite: PHY 223 
  
  •  

    EE 551 - Lasers


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Laser radiation properties, laser cavities, coherence, atomic spectra, pumping rate, power gain, threshold conditions, beam shape, moved structure; ion, molecular, solid-state, dye, semiconductor, and fiber lasers.

    Prerequisite: EE 450 /PHY 450  or EE 550 /PHY 550 
  
  •  

    EE 553 - Optical Metrology


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Modern optical metrology with emphasis on non-destructive testing; Fourier optics; Moiré and polarization methods; classic and holographic interferometry; speckle techniques; fringe analysis.

    Prerequisite: EE 450 /PHY 450  or EE 550 /PHY 550 
  
  •  

    EE 555 - Embedded Systems Software


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Advances course in embedded systems software design and development. Topics include bootloaders, embedded operating systems (RTOS, Embedded Linux), memory management systems, file systems, device drivers, integrated development environments (Eclipse, Compilers/Linkers/Make files), software revision control, and embedded programming (C++). Cross-listed with EE 455.

    Prerequisite: MSE Graduate standing
  
  •  

    EE 565 - Sensors and Instrumentation


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Advanced course in sensors and instrumentation for embedded applications. Topics include a study of transducers, medical sensors, position sensors, automotive sensors, and sensor arrays. Students will also study sensor synchronization, A/D converters, linearization, sampling, error sources/budget, and noise margin analysis. Cross-listed with EE 465.

  
  •  

    EE 575 - Micropower Systems


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Advanced course in low-power solutions for embedded systems. Topics will include low-power processor architectures, power management subsystems, processor sleep modes, power circuits, power supply sequencing, battery technology, rechargeable power sources, charge capacity models, loT applications. Cross-listed with EE 475.

    Prerequisite: MSE Graduate standing
  
  •  

    EE 585 - Printed Circuit Board Design


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    A course on modern PCB technology and design skills required for successful implementation of PCB designs in industry. This course provides direct, hands-on experience with industry standards, tools, and design techniques. Student will learn schematic capture and PCB layout. Cross-listed with EE 485.

    Prerequisite: MSE Graduate standing
  
  •  

    EE 595 - Selected Graduate Topics in Electrical Engineering


    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    Selected electrical, computer, and embedded engineering topics at the graduate level. Course may be repeated for credit.

  
  •  

    EE 596 - Graduate Research & Development


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Research and development in electrical, computer, and embedded engineering topics at the graduate level. Course may be repeated for credit.

  
  •  

    EE 597 - Graduate Project


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Graduate project in electrical, computer, and embedded engineering topics. Course may be repeated for credit.

  
  •  

    EE 598 - Graduate Thesis


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Graduate thesis in electrical, computer, and embedded engineering topics. Course may be repeated for credit.

  
  •  

    EE 599 - Practicum


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Supervised practical experience in electrical, computer, and embedded engineering topics at the graduate level. Course may be repeated for credit.


Electronics Engineering Technology

  
  •  

    EET 215 - Digital Circuits I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Introduction to combinational logic, gates, Boolean Algebra, Karnaugh mapping, number systems/codes, arithmetic circuits, encoders/decoders, multiplexers/demultiplexers, comparators, parity, code conversions, introduction to HDL, PLD HW implementation.

    Prerequisite: MATH 111 
  
  •  

    EET 216 - Digital Circuits II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Introduction to sequential logic, latches, flip-flops, timers, counters, registers, finite state machines, logic testing. DC parameters and timing analysis.

    Prerequisite: EET 215 
  
  •  

    EET 217 - Electric Circuits I


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    DC Analysis and First-Order Transients. Ohm’s law, Kirchhoff ‘s laws, nodal analysis, mesh analysis, source transformations, Thévenin and Norton equivalents, maximum power transfer, superposition, introduction to op-amps, inductance and capacitance, transient response of RC and RL circuits.

    Prerequisite: MATH 111 
  
  •  

    EET 218 - Electric Circuits II


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    AC Analysis, Second-Order Transients, introduction to electric power. Transient response of second-order circuits, sinusoids and phasors, sinusoidal steady-state analysis, nodal analysis, mesh analysis, source transformations, Thévenin and Norton equivalents, sinusoidal steady-state power calculations, balanced three-phase circuits, mutual inductance, transformers.

    Prerequisites: EET 217  and MATH 112  
  
  •  

    EET 219 - Semiconductor Devices and Amplifiers


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Introduction to semiconductor devices, characteristics and biasing of diodes and transistors, analysis and design of circuits using diodes, bipolar junction transistors and field-effect transistors. Applications of transistors as diodes and switches.

    Prerequisite: EET 218 
  
  •  

    EET 237 - AC Circuits, Filters and Signals


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    RC transient analysis, sinusoidal AC voltage, phasors, average and effective value, the decibel, simple RC transfer functions, low-pass, high-pass and band-pass filters, periodic and aperiodic signals in time and frequency, bandwidth. For non-EET majors.

    Prerequisites: EE 221  or EET 115 with grade “C” or better, and MATH 252 
    Corequisite: EET 238  
  
  •  

    EET 238 - AC Circuits, Filters and Signals Laboratory


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1

    Lab to accompany EET 237 . For non-EET majors.

    Prerequisites: EE 221  or EET 115 with grade “C” or better, and MATH 252  
    Corequisite: EET 237  
  
  •  

    EET 308 - Introduction to MOS Microelectronics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Introduction to microelectronics, semiconductor physics, integrated circuit (IC) technology, p-n junction and MOS (Metal- Oxide-Semiconductor) electrostatics, MOS FETs (Field-Effect Transistors), selected digital circuits using CMOS (Complementary MOS) FETs, PSPICE modeling of IC MOSFETs.

    Prerequisites: CST 262  and EET 237 , or instructor consent
    Corequisite: EET 309  
  
  •  

    EET 309 - Introduction to MOS Microelectronics Laboratory


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1

    Laboratory companion to EET 308 . Theoretical concepts discussed in lecture verified using available components and instrumentation. Computer simulation using PSPICE. Written and oral laboratory reports required.

    Prerequisites: CST 262 , and EET 238  or EET 246, or instructor consent
    Corequisite: EET 308  

Emergency Medical Technology-Paramedic

  
  •  

    EMS 107 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
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    EMS 115 - Introduction to EMS


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Introduces the fundamentals of an emergency medical services system, history, and professional roles and responsibilities. Discusses medical/legal and ethical issues, research and evidence based practice.

  
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    EMS 135 - Wilderness First Aid


    (Su)
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1

    Basic First Aid and CPR training for the outdoor adventurer or world traveler. Scenario based learning using medical equipment improvised for wilderness settings. Course completion earns Wilderness First Aid and CPR certifications meeting the outdoor industry requirements. Customized group courses available.

  
  •  

    EMS 151 - Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) I


    (F)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 9
    Credit Hours: 6

    The first of two courses required for an entry-level career in emergency medical services. The course introduces students to the EMS system, professional attributes of an EMT, ambulance operations and the basic knowledge and skills of an EMT.

    Prerequisite: Current CPR certification
  
  •  

    EMS 152 - Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) II


    (W)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 9
    Credit Hours: 6

    The second of two course focuses on the basic recognition and treatment of specific illnesses and injuries. The course includes 16-hours clinical and ambulance experience. Students successfully completing the course are eligible for Oregon and national certification examinations.

    Prerequisite: EMS 151 
  
  •  

    EMS 190 - Emergency Medical Technician Externship


    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 12
    Credit Hours: 4

    EMS field experience with an affiliated transport agency. Students work at a BLS level under the direct supervision on one of the local EMS agency ambulances.

    Prerequisite: EMS 152  or Oregon EMT certification
  
  •  

    EMS 200 - Medical Terminology


    (F)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Students build a strong medical vocabulary using prefixes, suffixes, and Greek and Latin verbs and adjectives. Students learn anatomical roots and examine anatomical structures, disease, procedures, tumors, and descriptive terms using simple word analysis.

  
  •  

    EMS 207 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    EMS 211 - Prehospital Emergency Pharmacology


    (W)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Lectures relating specific emergencies to the types of medications used for treatment. Includes classifications, actions, indications, administration and dosages, precautions and side effects of each of the medications used in prehospital treatment of medical and traumatic emergencies. In addition, students learn common prescription medications found in the home.

    Prerequisite: CHE 210 
  
  •  

    EMS 218 - Trauma Emergencies


    (F)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Introduces the epidemiology and kinematics of trauma, and integrates the assessment findings with pathophysiology in the management of the acutely injured patient. Discusses considerations for special patient populations and includes a Prehospital Trauma Life Support certification course.

  
  •  

    EMS 231 - Medical Emergencies I


    (F)
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    The first in a series of three courses addressing the epidemiology and pathophysiology of various medical complaints; integrates assessment findings with the formulation of a treatment plan for the acute illness.

  
  •  

    EMS 232 - Medical Emergencies II


    (W)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A continuation of the series of three courses addressing the epidemiology and pathophysiology of various medical complaints; integrates assessment findings with the formulation of a treatment plan for the acute illness.

    Prerequisite: EMS 231 
  
  •  

    EMS 233 - Medical Emergencies III


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The conclusion of the sequence in medical emergencies where the epidemiology, pathophysiology and assessment findings are integrated to form a treatments plan for acute illnesses in the emergency setting.

    Prerequisite: EMS 232 
  
  •  

    EMS 235 - Basic Electrocardiography


    (F)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Fundamentals of electrocardiography and interpretation of normal and abnormal ECG patterns. Normal and abnormal wave patterns, presentation and treatment of common cardiac diseases.

  
  •  

    EMS 236 - Advanced Electrocardiography


    (W)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Building upon basic EKG knowledge, this course advances into 12-lead EKG interpretation and prehospital treatment. Focusing on signs and symptoms of ischemia or infarction, axis deviation, and other EKG anomalies, students learn about various treatment modalities.

  
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    EMS 241 - Paramedic Crisis Resource Management I


    (F)
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3

    The first in a series of 3 courses addressing human factors contribution to EMS scene management. PCRM I focuses on human error, perception modalities, human emotion and motivation, and teamwork theory.

  
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    EMS 242 - Paramedic Crises Resource Management II


    (W)
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1

    The second class in a series of 3 courses addressing the theory and practice of human factors contribution to EMS scene management. PCRM II focuses on the following human factor contributions to scene performance; review of acute healthcare environment challenges, cognitive attention, and crisis communication strategies.

    Prerequisite: EMS 241  
  
  •  

    EMS 243 - Paramedic Crises Resource Management III


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1

    The third class in a series of 3 courses addressing the theory and practice of human factors contribution to EMS scene management. PCRM III focuses on the following human factor contributions to scene performance; stress and coping on decision-making, on scene leadership characteristics, and organizational influences on error.

    Prerequisite: EMS 242 
  
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    EMS 271 - Paramedic Skills Laboratory I


    (F)
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3

    The first of three courses reviews EMT level skills and introduces the advanced level paramedic skills. Students learn safe and effective skills performance and begin to integrate assessment, management and skills performance.

  
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    EMS 272 - Paramedic Skills Laboratory II


    (W)
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 2

    The second course in the series continues the development of advanced level skills proficiency. Students integrates knowledge of specific patient complaints with assessment and management skills.

    Prerequisite: EMS 271 
  
  •  

    EMS 273 - Paramedic Skills Laboratory III


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1

    The third course in the series of advanced level skills development. Students demonstrate proficiency and prepare for paramedic licensing examinations.

    Prerequisite: EMS 272 
  
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    EMS 283 - Clinical Practicum I


    (W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 18
    Credit Hours: 6

    Focusing on the emergency medical practices of a paramedic, students integrate classroom studies into clinical practices while working under the direct supervision of health care professionals.

    Prerequisites: CHE 210 , EMS 218 , EMS 231 , EMS 235 , EMS 241 , and EMS 271  
  
  •  

    EMS 284 - Clinical Practicum II


    (W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 18
    Credit Hours: 6

    Students integrate knowledge and skills with patient care practices as they rotate through clinical experience in a variety medical specialties. Students work under the direct supervision of health care professionals in each medical specialty.

    Prerequisites: CHE 210 , EMS 218 , EMS 231 , EMS 235 , EMS 241 , and EMS 271  
  
  •  

    EMS 291 - Paramedic Field Externship Practicum I


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 12
    Credit Hours: 4

    The first of two field experience courses with an affiliated advanced life support agency. Students complete an orientation to the field and work under the direct supervision of a paramedic preceptor responding to 911 emergency calls.

  
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    EMS 292 - Paramedic Field Externship Practicum II


    (Su)
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 36
    Credit Hours: 12

    The continuation of the field experience courses with an affiliated advanced life support agency. Students work in the field and work under the direct supervision of a paramedic preceptor responding to 911 emergency calls.

    Prerequisite: EMS 291 
  
  •  

    EMS 321 - Community Paramedic I


    (W)
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    First course in a two course series addressing the management of chronic illness, social service connection, and healthcare system navigation as it relates to the prehospital environment.

    Prerequisite: Current National or State Paramedic Certification
  
  •  

    EMS 322 - Community Paramedic II


    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    Second course in a two course series addressing the management of chronic illness, social service connection and healthcare system navigation as it relates to the prehospital environment.

    Prerequisite: Current National or State Paramedic Certification
  
  •  

    EMS 331 - Critical Care Transport I


    (W)
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    The first of 2 courses is designed to prepare paramedics to provide advanced critical care during transports, including performing advanced clinical patient assessments and providing invasive care beyond the standard scope of advanced pre-hospital care.

    Prerequisite: Paramedic credentials or instructor consent
  
  •  

    EMS 332 - Critical Care Transport II


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The second of 2 courses is designed to prepare paramedics to provide advanced critical care during transports, including performing advanced clinical patient assessments and providing invasive care beyond the standard scope of advanced pre-hospital care.

    Prerequisites: EMS 331  and EMS 381  
  
  •  

    EMS 341 - Community Paramedic Clinical I


    (F)
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Credit Hours: 2

    The first course in a series of two courses addressing the management of chronic illness, social service connection, and health care system navigation as it relates to the prehospital environment. This course focuses on the management of chronic/sub-acute illness.

    Prerequisite: Current National or State Paramedic Certification
    Corequisite: EMS 321 
  
  •  

    EMS 342 - Community Paramedic Clinical II


    (W)
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Credit Hours: 2

    The second course in a series of two courses addressing the management of chronic illness, social service connection, and health care system navigation as it relates to the prehospital environment. This course focuses on the management of chronic/sub-acute illness.

    Corequisite: EMS 322 
  
  •  

    EMS 381 - Critical Care Clinical Practicum I


    (W)
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 1

    The first of two practicum classes that exposes students to critical care transport topics focusing on psychomotor skills and the science behind them. This practicum is designed to prepare the student for EMS 382  ICU and critical care transport experience.

    Corequisite: EMS 331 
  
  •  

    EMS 382 - Clinical Care Clinical Practicum II


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 9
    Credit Hours: 3

    The second of two practicum classes that exposes students to critical care transport environments that may include experiences with intensive care units, fixed wing transport, rotor wing transport, critical care ground transport, as well as various specialty critical care teams.

    Prerequisite: EMS 331 
    Corequisite: EMS 332 
  
  •  

    EMS 444 - EMS Systems Leadership and Management


    (F)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Explores the fundamental skills of managing and leading in EMS: concepts, principles and practices of leaders in the EMS industry. Case study discussions and analysis. Examines EMS systems, operations, resources and regulation of EMS. Industry leaders provide guest lectures.

    Prerequisites: BUS 317  and PSY 347   
  
  •  

    EMS 456 - Research Methods in EMS


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2

    An introductory course in EMS research covering hypothesis formulation, design and use of data-gathering instruments, data collection, and methods of data analysis and presentation. Research and technical reports appearing in professional publications and archives are examined.

    Prerequisite: MATH 361 
  
  •  

    EMS 496 - Capstone Project I


    (W)
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 6
    Credit Hours: 3

    Students formulate a detailed plan for a project or independent research study within the EMS industry. Project plan will include topic outline and goals, timeline, industry contacts. Faculty advisor will be assigned.

    Prerequisites: MATH 361  and WRI 227   
  
  •  

    EMS 497 - Capstone Project II


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 6
    Credit Hours: 3

    Implementation and completion of student project planned in EMS 496 . Project results to be delivered in a report presented to an audience of EMS peers. Students will have scheduled meetings with a faculty advisor to track progress and determine readiness for presentation.

    Prerequisite: EMS 496 

Engineering

  
  •  

    ENGR 101 - Introduction to Engineering I


    (F)
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 2

    Introduces the student to engineering with a focus on academic success, professional development, ethics, communication, creative problem solving techniques, engineering tools (CAD/CAE), and design concepts. A discipline-specific team-based laboratory experience encourages consideration of a chosen engineering discipline.

  
  •  

    ENGR 102 - Introduction to Engineering II


    (W)
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 2

    The student will focus on their chosen discipline through an interdisciplinary team-based design project including problem identification, measurement, analysis and presentation to peers. Emphasis will be placed on proper usage of engineering tools and instruments and sound design practices.

    Prerequisite: ENGR 101 
  
  •  

    ENGR 111 - MMET Orientation


    (F)
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 2

    Topics include: survey of the engineering profession, educational and professional development, standards of practice; engineering information, calculations, and analysis. An engineering design project will be incorporated. This course provides knowledge and skills to engineering students which will benefit their future academic and professional endeavors.

    Prerequisite: Declared major in the BSME, BSMET, or BSMFG program
  
  •  

    ENGR 120 - Fundamentals of Engineering Design, Analytical Tools, and CAD


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3

    Fundamentals of engineering design, including analytical and computational tools that introduce design concepts and build a foundation of engineering knowledge that will be helpful to students starting off in engineering and technology disciplines.  Computer aided design and drafting, problem solving, documentation, analysis, teamwork, and multi-step engineering calculations.

  
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    ENGR 121 - Engineering Principles and Problem Solving


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3

    Topics include modeling of real-world concepts and systems, basic statics, electronics, energy generation, and robotics. Using both analytical and computational tools to represent, analyze, and improve on real-world situations. Identifying the correct type of system to employ, improving the efficiency of existing systems, working in multi-disciplinary groups, developing and presenting ideas, prototyping as well as testing iteratively.

  
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    ENGR 122 - Electronics and Computation in Engineering


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3

    Fundamental electrical and computational topics in engineering. Building and analyzing circuits, using mathematical concepts to develop solutions, and using both analytical and computational tools to gain knowledge and hands-on skills. Troubleshooting and testing of ideas as well as presenting ideas in an organized and systematic manner to others. Provides a basic foundation of knowledge and skills that will transfer well to continued education, technical jobs and self-confidence.

  
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    ENGR 207 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    ENGR 211 - Engineering Mechanics: Statics


    (F,W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    Fundamental principles of mechanics of rigid bodies and the application of these principles to engineering problems.

    Prerequisite: PHY 201  or PHY 221 
    Pre- or Corequisite: MATH 252 
  
  •  

    ENGR 212 - Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics


    (W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Kinematics of particles and rigid bodies. Kinetics of particles and rigid bodies in plane motion, including Newton’s second law, work and energy, and impulse and momentum.

    Prerequisites: ENGR 211  and MATH 252  
  
  •  

    ENGR 213 - Engineering Mechanics: Strength of Materials


    (F,W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Internal stresses and deformations of structural members and machines when subjected to external forces.

    Prerequisites: ENGR 211  and MATH 252 
  
  •  

    ENGR 236 - Fundamentals of Electric Circuits


    (F,S)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Resistive circuits, operational amplifiers, capacitors, inductors, transient analysis, sine waves, AC circuit analysis, resonance, transformers. Not for Electronics Engineering Technology and Computer Engineering Technology students.

    Prerequisites: MATH 252 , and PHY 202  or PHY 222 
  
  •  

    ENGR 266 - Engineering Computation


    (F,W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3

    Programming and problem solving using current computer software. General programming techniques using conditional statements, looping, subroutines, and data input/output will be stressed. Consideration of features specific to the software being used will also be presented.

    Prerequisite: MATH 112 
  
  •  

    ENGR 267 - Engineering Programming


    (W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3

    Computer programming principles. Control structures. Structural programming principles. Functions and scripts. MATLAB programming. LabVIEW programming. Application of engineering programming principles in projects.

    Prerequisite: MATH 251 
  
  •  

    ENGR 305 - Nanoscience and Nanotechnology


    (F)
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    Survey of chemical and physical phenomena as applied to nanoscale materials, including metal and semiconductor nanoparticles and carbon nanostructures. Discussion of major synthesis and characterization techniques. Biological and engineering applications of nanoscale materials.

    Prerequisites: CHE 202  or CHE 222 , and PHY 222  or PHY 223  
  
  •  

    ENGR 318 - Engineering Mechanics: Fluids


    (F)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Fundamental properties of fluids, fluid statics and pressure variation, flow characterization, momentum and forces due to fluid motion, energy of fluids in motion, and flow in conduits. Emphasis on civil and mechanical engineering applications of fluid mechanics principles.

    Prerequisites: ENGR 211  and MATH 252 
  
  •  

    ENGR 355 - Thermodynamics


    (F,W)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An introductory course in thermodynamics, the science of heat energy conversion. Develops understanding of energy, heat, work, efficiency, and ideal thermodynamic cycles. Teaches first and second laws of thermodynamics and perfect gas law.

    Prerequisites: MATH 252 , and PHY 202  or PHY 222  
  
  •  

    ENGR 407 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    ENGR 415 - Occupational Safety


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3

    Topics include current occupational safety and health issues. Practical application of regulations in the industrial setting. Compliance to Industrial Hygiene and General Safety Standards. Common safety violations and implementation of safety programs.

    Prerequisite: Junior standing in any MMET program
  
  •  

    ENGR 420 - Engineering Modeling


    (F)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Development of linear and nonlinear models of engineering systems. Modeling of mechanical, electrical, electromechanical, fluid, and thermal systems. System identification from data.

    Prerequisites: EE 225  or MECH 490 , ENGR 266  or ENGR 267 MATH 341 , and PHY 223  
  
  •  

    ENGR 421 - Automation Systems


    (F)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Design of industrial automation systems. Industrial networking and data handling. Industrial controller and operator interface configuration and programming. Design of SCADA systems.

    Prerequisites: EE 355  or MECH 436 , ENGR 420 , and REE 463  or MECH 363   
  
  •  

    ENGR 422 - Process Control


    (W)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Design of continuous and batch process control systems. Advanced control schemes, including model-based methods.

    Prerequisite: ENGR 421 
  
  •  

    ENGR 423 - Motion Control and Robotics


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Motion control components, including power supplies, controllers, instrumentation, and actuators. Robot kinematics and servo control. Design of motion control systems.

    Prerequisites: ENGR 212 ENGR 421 , and MET 326  or REE 253   
  
  •  

    ENGR 445 - Engineering Project Management


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Applications of the Critical Path Method to organization and control of engineering projects. Applications software will be used to create and evaluate project networks to develop management reports.

    Prerequisite: Junior standing in Engineering or Engineering Technology
  
  •  

    ENGR 465 - Capstone Project


    (F,W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Lab Hours: 6
    Credit Hours: 2

    Students apply material learned in other courses, develop expertise on a specific topic, work closely with a faculty member to implement the project and improve professional communication skills by writing a project report. Course may be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Junior standing and instructor consent
  
  •  

    ENGR 485 - Fundamentals of Engineering Exam Preparation


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 1

    A preparation course covering the requirements of, and providing a review for, the NCEES FE exam.

    Prerequisite: Senior standing in an MMET program
  
  •  

    ENGR 507 - Seminar


    (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    ENGR 511 - Research Methods & Innovation: Intellectual Property


    (F)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Intellectual property (IP) development, evaluation, and strategy. IP fundamentals, patent fundamentals, conducting patentability searches, evaluating the patentability potential of an invention, drafting invention disclosures for patent applications, assessing the value of a patent or patent portfolio, and IP licensing fundamentals.

  
  •  

    ENGR 512 - Research Methods & Innovation: Research Methods


    (W)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Fundamental concepts of scientific research. An introduction to the concepts underlying peer-reviewed research, evaluating the relevance and impact of sources, conducting literature reviews, evaluating published findings, using research productivity tools, using statistical methods, designing research studies, and writing scholarly articles.

  
  •  

    ENGR 513 - Research Methods & Innovation: Strategy & Innovation


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Strategy and innovation concepts with a focus on technology commercialization. Business strategy frameworks, financial analysis, strategic marketing, operations management, business models, project management, business law, and entrepreneurship.

  
  •  

    ENGR 596 - Graduate Research & Development


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Research and development in engineering at the graduate level. Course may be repeated for credit.

  
  •  

    ENGR 597 - Graduate Project


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Graduate project in engineering topics. Course may be repeated for credit.

     

  
  •  

    ENGR 598 - Graduate Thesis


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Graduate thesis in engineering topics. Course may be repeated for credit.

  
  •  

    ENGR 599 - Practicum


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Supervised practical experience in engineering topics at the graduate level. Course may be repeated for credit.


Engineering Technology

  
  •  

    ENGT 107 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    ENGT 207 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    ENGT 307 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    ENGT 310 - Introduction to Geothermal Energy


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Overview of geothermal energy: distribution, geology, hydrology, and geochemistry; exploration and extraction techniques; uses including power generation, space heating, agriculture, process and multistage utilization; and environmental, economic, and legal considerations. Field trips to local sites.

  
  •  

    ENGT 311 - Passive Solar and Solar Cell Design


    (W)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Residential passive solar heating and superinsulation construction techniques including heat load calculations using the Balcomb SHF method. Technical and economic analysis of solar electric cells, storage batteries, and inverter technology.

    Prerequisite: PHY 202  or instructor consent
  
  •  

    ENGT 312 - Critical Path Techniques


    (F)
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 2

    Scheduling techniques used by management on engineering and industrial projects. The course will concentrate on the Critical Path Method (CPM), but will also include comparisons with Gantt charts and Program Evaluation Review Technique (PERT). Concepts will be applied to mini-projects in class and expanded through the use of selected computer software packages.

 

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