2017-18 University Catalog 
    
    Dec 10, 2022  
2017-18 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions in this section are reasonable summaries only and are neither completely inclusive nor completely exclusive of total course content for any given course.

Courses listed herein may or may not be offered each term.

Courses are listed alphabetically according to prefix.

Numbering Code

Courses are grouped into a three-digit number series which indicates the normal teaching levels. Some variations may occur.

1-99 Preparatory and Developmental Courses. Courses numbered below 100 are not applicable toward a degree even though units are assigned, grades are awarded and tuition is assessed.

Lower-Division Courses (freshman and sophomore)
100-199 First-Year Courses
200-299 Second-Year Courses

Upper-Division Courses (junior and senior)
300-399 Third-Year Courses
400-499 Fourth-Year Courses

Graduate Courses
500-599 Graduate Courses

Other Codes

Each Term:

Some courses in this section have a code following the course title. This code designates when the course will be offered. F indicates Fall, W indicates Winter, S indicates Spring.

Lecture, Lab, Credit Hours:

The three numbers following the course title. For example:

CST 101 Introduction to Personal Computing
(3-3-4) = weekly lecture hours – lab hours – total credits

For more information, see Baccalaureate General Education Requirements  

Courses with the following notation fulfill the appropriate general education requirements: 
C - Communication H - Humanities HP - Humanities Performance SS - Social Science

Special Terms

As Required: This term designates a course or series of courses which will be offered only as enrollment, student interest, or individual department needs demand and as staffing allows. A course so designated may be offered if special student needs, situations of extreme hardship, or other unusual circumstances deem it in the best interest of both the student(s) and the institution to do so.

Hours to be Arranged Each Term: Normally students negotiate individually with faculty members and/or departments and arrange to have courses so designated offered for the term most suitable to their unique situation.

Corequisite: A course that must be taken simultaneously with another course. Corequisites are noted at the end of each course description.

Prerequisite: A course that must be passed satisfactorily before another course may be taken. Prerequisites are noted at the end of each course description. Courses transferred in to Oregon Tech with a C- or better meet the prerequisite requirement of obtaining a C or better.

Quarter Credit: A credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than:

  1. One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester or trimester hour of credit, or ten to twelve weeks for one quarter hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or
  2. At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution, including laboratory work, internships, practicals, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

A numerical credit value assigned to certain number of lecture or laboratory hours. A lecture class meeting for three 50-minute periods a week would be assigned three units of credit. Students have traditionally been expected to spend an additional six hours of outside class work per week for each three units of lecture class credit. Generally, a lab class requires three hours per week for one unit of credit, or a total of nine in-lab hours with no additional outside class work expected for three units of lab class credit.

Reading and Conference: A course taken on an independent study basis with the supervision of an instructor, usually consisting of weekly conferences, assigned readings, research papers, etc.

Seminar: A class taught by a group discussion process rather than by means of formal lecture. Student research and reporting are usually expected.

Sequence: A series of classes in the same subject area that, taken as a whole, comprise a full year’s work. Generally, course sequences are numbered consecutively, and often (though not always) should be taken in the numerical order listed (i.e., CHE 201  should be taken before CHE 202 , etc.).

 

Geomatics

  
  •  

    GME 498 - Workshop


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    GME 499 - Independent Study


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)


Health Education

  
  •  

    HED 107 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    HED 207 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    HED 240 - Emergency Care and CPR


    (F,W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2

    Comprehensive coverage of emergency care for a wide variety of injuries or illnesses. Course content includes artificial respiration and cardiopulmonary resuscitation, wounds, and bleeding; shock; burns; poisonings; bone, joint, and muscle injuries; cold- and heat-related injuries; alcohol and drug emergencies; and methods of transportation. Emphasis on victim examination, evaluation, and assessment tools and appropriate immediate and temporary care.

  
  •  

    HED 246 - Drugs and Alcohol Problems of Modern Society


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2

    Physiological and psychological effects of drugs, from caffeine to heroin. A brief study of neurophysiology and pharmacology. Investigation of the major drug classifications. Other topics include alcohol advertising, codependency, drug-affected babies, treatment and recovery, and legalization issues.

  
  •  

    HED 250 - Contemporary Health Issues


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2

    Topics related to the maintenance of a healthy lifestyle. Emphasis on lifestyle choices and behavior patterns that affect one’s state of wellness. Topics include stress management; emotional, social, and spiritual well-being; nutrition, fitness and exercise; weight management; cardiovascular disease and cancer risk reduction; addictions; and other lifestyle related health behaviors.

  
  •  

    HED 260 - Diet and Exercise for Lifetime Fitness


    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2

    Practical concepts of nutrition and exercise, their role in disease risk, obesity, and weight control. Consumer concerns, advertising, fads, gimmicks. Fitness and dietary evaluations.

  
  •  

    HED 275 - Introduction to Sports Medicine


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3

    An introduction to the principles and practice of sports medicine. Emphasis on the prevention and treatment of common sports injuries. Instruction includes understanding the basic mechanisms behind injury and practical experience in preventative measures and basic treatment.

  
  •  

    HED 307 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    HED 407 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)


History

  
  •  

    HIST 101 - History of Western Civilization (From the origins of human civilization to 1000 A.D.)


    (F) SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Development of Western civilization from early beginning to the present, with attention to political, economic, religious, social, and cultural factors. Courses need not be taken in sequence.

  
  •  

    HIST 102 - History of Western Civilization (From 1000 A.D. to 1789)


    (W) SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Development of Western civilization from early beginning to the present, with attention to political, economic, religious, social, and cultural factors. Courses need not be taken in sequence.

  
  •  

    HIST 103 - History of Western Civilization (From 1789 to the present)


    (S) SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Development of Western civilization from early beginning to the present, with attention to political, economic, religious, social, and cultural factors. Courses need not be taken in sequence.

  
  •  

    HIST 107 - Seminar


    SS
    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    HIST 201 - U.S. History (Pre-Columbian and colonial times to 1840)


    (F,W) SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The historical development of the United States, its economic, political, and social institutions from the colonial period to the present. Courses need not be taken in sequence.

  
  •  

    HIST 202 - U.S. History (1840, Westward expansion and the Civil War to 1899)


    (W) SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The historical development of the United States, its economic, political, and social institutions from the colonial period to the present. Courses need not be taken in sequence.

  
  •  

    HIST 203 - U.S. History (1900 to present)


    (S) SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The historical development of the United States, its economic, political, and social institutions from the colonial period to the present. Courses need not be taken in sequence.

  
  •  

    HIST 207 - Seminar


    SS
    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    HIST 224 - Technology and the Ancient World


    (F) SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The interaction of technology and world civilization from earliest times to 1500 A.D. Topics include the development of agriculture, urbanization, the place of technology in the Roman and Chinese empires, Medieval engineering, and the technological roots of globalization.

  
  •  

    HIST 225 - Technology and the Rise of the West


    (W) SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The economic and social roots of Western dominance of the world economy after 1500. Topics include the Trans-Atlantic Exchange, the Industrial Revolution, urbanization, globalization, and the technological roots of colonialism.

  
  •  

    HIST 226 - Technology and the Modern World


    (S) SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The interaction of technological change and world civilization in the 20th century. Topics include the role of corporations in technological change, the theory of Large Technological Systems (LTS), Cold War science and technology, and origins of the internet.

  
  •  

    HIST 245 - Hitler and the Holocaust


    (W) SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Introduction to the history of the Holocaust, with a focus on the role of Adolph Hitler. Topics include Hitler’s life and political career, the social, technological and economic structure of the Holocaust, and Hitler and the Holocaust in popular culture.

  
  •  

    HIST 275 - Introduction to the History of Medicine


    (F) SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Introduction to the history of medicine, with a focus on American medicine in the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include medical professionalization, the social, technological and economic structure of the medical industry, and medicine in popular culture.

  
  •  

    HIST 307 - Seminar


    SS
    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    HIST 335 - The Engineering Profession


    (F,W) SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    The emergence and development of the engineering profession in Europe and North America. Topics include the changing nature of the profession’s work and institutions, the role of engineering professional societies, the relationship between engineers, engineering technologists, and engineering technicians, and the place of engineers in society.

    Prerequisite: WRI 123  or WRI 227 
  
  •  

    HIST 356 - A History of Energy


    (F,W,S) SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Study of the emphasis societies place on the development, safeguarding and exploitation of energy resources. Development of energy resources since the Industrial Revolution; exploitation of energy resources; oil shocks of the 1970s, glut of the 1980s; the modern energy paradigm.

    Prerequisite: WRI 123  or WRI 227 
  
  •  

    HIST 357 - History of the Electric Grid


    (S) SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Study of the electric grid as a large technological system. Topics of study include the creation of the electric grid by Edison and others, rural electrification, the rise and fall of the utility consensus and the politics of deregulation.

    Prerequisite: WRI 123  or WRI 227 
  
  •  

    HIST 392 - Modern Asia


    (S) SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    China, Japan, and Korea from the early nineteenth century to the present. Emphasis on modern political movements and economic and cultural transformation.

    Prerequisite: WRI 123  or WRI 227 
  
  •  

    HIST 407 - Seminar


    SS
    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    HIST 452 - Globalization and the Pacific Northwest


    (F,S) SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This seminar addresses globalization in the PNW. Topics include colonialism, mercantilism, markets, imperialism, and cultural exchange. PNW industries involved in globalization such as timber, fishing, agriculture, tourism, and oil will be examined. Social movements and protests will also be considered.

    Prerequisite: WRI 122 
  
  •  

    HIST 468 - History of the Pacific Northwest


    (S) SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    This course will cover the history of the Pacific Northwest including Native American settlements, exploration and later American settlements. It will include the impacts of institutional growth, urbanization, and resource development. The impact of national events upon the region will be explored.

    Prerequisite: WRI 122 
  
  •  

    HIST 478 - History of Oregon


    SS
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An overview of the history of Oregon. The primary focus is the pattern of European settlement of Oregon, the origins and development of state government and the impact of commercial and industrial development.

    Prerequisite: WRI 123  or WRI 227 

Health Sciences

  
  •  

    HSC 207 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

    Prerequisite: Health Sciences major or instructor consent
  
  •  

    HSC 407 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    HSC 485 - Research and Project Proposal


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    General aspects of conducting research with emphasis on biomedical approaches, constructing and testing hypotheses, interpreting and validating data, assessment of selected research paper, development and submission of a research proposal.

    Prerequisites: MATH 361 , Health Sciences major, or instructor consent

Humanities

  
  •  

    HUM 105 - Everyone’s a Critic: Texts, Images, Games


    H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Introduction to the methods of literary analysis and cultural studies. How to effectively and thoroughly analyze, discuss and criticize the meanings behind literature, visual art, film, the graphic novel, and video games from the perspective of literary studies.

  
  •  

    HUM 107 - Seminar


    H
    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    HUM 125 - Introduction to Technology, Society and Values


    (F,W,S) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An introduction to the relationship of economic, political, and social contexts to technological development with a focus on human values.

  
  •  

    HUM 147 - Western Culture in the Classical Age


    (F) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Study of the ideas and values from the classical period which have profoundly influenced Western culture. Readings and discussion will focus on arts, literature, and philosophy.

  
  •  

    HUM 148 - Western Culture in the Medieval Age


    (W) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Study of the ideas and values from the early Medieval to the Renaissance period which have profoundly influenced Western culture. Readings and discussion will focus on arts, literature, and philosophy.

  
  •  

    HUM 149 - Western Culture in the Modern Age


    (S) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Study of the ideas and values from the Age of Enlightenment to today which have profoundly influenced Western Culture. Readings and discussion will focus on arts, literature, and philosophy.

  
  •  

    HUM 207 - Seminar


    H
    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    HUM 235 - Introduction to Film


    (F,S) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 4

    Introduction to film history and appreciation. Students will engage with film across periods, genres, and national traditions to develop their understanding and analysis of the art of cinema. Film making techniques and the evolution of film culture are addressed.

  
  •  

    HUM 245 - Digital Diversity


    (W) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    A cultural studies approach to internet culture, this course considers online identity construction, the worldwide technological access gap, social media as a mechanism for political revolution, and race/class/gender bias in virtual communities.

  
  •  

    HUM 307 - Seminar


    H
    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    HUM 335 - Video Game Studies


    (S) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Students will read essays and criticism about video games, including traditional console and PC games, “serious games,” and social-media-powered games. If possible, some assignments will also involve playing the games we discuss.

    Prerequisite: WRI 121  or WRI 122 
  
  •  

    HUM 366 - Engineering, Business and the Holocaust


    (W) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Examines three questions: what happened during the Holocaust, who was responsible, and what happened to those responsible. Topics include Nazi philosophy, anti-Semitic legislation, the camp system, German engineering and American business involvement, and aftermath.

    Prerequisite: WRI 122 
  
  •  

    HUM 407 - Seminar


    H
    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)


Journalism

  
  •  

    JOUR 107 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    JOUR 207 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    JOUR 211 - Publications-Student Newspaper


    (F,W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3

    Practical experience and training in the elementary principles of newspaper writing, makeup, and layout. Members of this class will publish the student newspaper.

    Prerequisite: WRI 121 
  
  •  

    JOUR 307 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    JOUR 311 - Advanced Publications - Student Newspaper


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 3
    Credit Hours: 3

    Provides advanced experience and training in principles of newspaper editing, reporting, writing, makeup, layout, and specialty areas. Class members serve as the editorial staff.

    Prerequisite: JOUR 211 
  
  •  

    JOUR 407 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)


Library Science

  
  •  

    LIS 305 - Research Strategies


    (W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Designed to guide students in senior projects, professional and graduate research. Understand information access, use, and synthesis, literature reviews, inquiry development, and research design. Recognize and practice ethical information use across professions. Articulate applications and limitations of researched topics.

    Prerequisite: WRI 123  or WRI 227 

Literature

  
  •  

    LIT 104 - Introduction to Literature


    (F) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Literature and the nature of literary experience through reading of prose and poetry drawn from American and other literatures. Works representing principal literary types are read in their entirety when possible, with emphasis on such elements as structure, style, characterization, imagery, and symbolism.

  
  •  

    LIT 105 - Introduction to Literature


    (W) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Literature and the nature of literary experience through reading of prose and poetry drawn from American and other literatures. Works representing principal literary types are read in their entirety when possible, with emphasis on such elements as structure, style, characterization, imagery, and symbolism.

  
  •  

    LIT 106 - Introduction to Literature


    (S) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Literature and the nature of literary experience through reading of prose and poetry drawn from American and other literatures. Works representing principal literary types are read in their entirety when possible, with emphasis on such elements as structure, style, characterization, imagery, and symbolism.

  
  •  

    LIT 107 - Seminar


    H
    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    LIT 207 - Seminar


    H
    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    LIT 225 - Contemporary Theater: Ashland Plays


    (S) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Contemporary live drama viewed at Ashland Shakespearean Festival Theater. Review and analysis of original script prior to play experience. Post review and analysis of play performance, content: plot, character, diction, melody, spectacle.

  
  •  

    LIT 235 - American Multicultural Literature


    (F) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An introductory study of short stories, poetry, essays, and a novel that illustrates the diversity of North American culture.

  
  •  

    LIT 246 - Creative Writing


    (W) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Examines the elements, structures and traditions of fiction writing through readings, discussions, and creative writing exercises. For students interested in writing fiction.

    Prerequisite: WRI 122 
  
  •  

    LIT 253 - 19th Century American Literature


    (F) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Survey of American Literature from 1800- 1900. Genres include short stories, novels, poetry, nonfiction narratives, and drama. Topics include Romanticism, Gothic literature, Transcendentalism, Colonialism, Emancipation, and Women’s Rights.

  
  •  

    LIT 254 - 20th Century American Literature


    (W) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Survey of American Literature from 1900- 1970. Genres include short stories, novels, poetry, nonfiction narratives, and drama. Topics include Urban Gothic literature, Modernism, World Wars 1 and 2, and Environmentalism.

  
  •  

    LIT 255 - Contemporary American Literature


    (S) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Survey of American Literature from 1970-present. Genres include short stories, novels, poetry, nonfiction ratives, graphic novels, and drama. Topics include Postmodernism, the Cold War, Cyberpunk Literature, Post-apocalyptic Literature, and Environmentalism.

  
  •  

    LIT 266 - Native American Literature and Film


    (S) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Explores connections to the human condition found in literature and stories authored by Native Americans with focus on a variety of themes including assimilation, ethnicity, survival and stereotyping. Documentary films and commercial cinema support and lend context to the readings. Students are encouraged to define and/or redefine their worldviews.

  
  •  

    LIT 305 - Ecological Issues in Nature Writing


    (W) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Study of nature writers and the role of the environment in Western culture. Texts and authors will be studied from a literary studies perspective and a social justice perspective.

    Prerequisite: WRI 121  or WRI 122 
  
  •  

    LIT 307 - Seminar


    H
    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    LIT 315 - Science Fiction Literature and Film


    (S) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Study of science fiction literature and film as expressions of the relationship between technology and culture(s). Approach will primarily be from a literary analysis perspective, with elements of film studies included.

    Prerequisite: WRI 121  or WRI 122 
  
  •  

    LIT 325 - The Metropolis


    (F) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Study of the history of the modern city in Western culture from a cultural studies perspective. Students discuss works of literature, film, and new media dealing with our understanding of urban space over time.

    Prerequisite: WRI 121  or WRI 122 
  
  •  

    LIT 335 - Travel Literature: Fiction and Nonfiction


    (F) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Study of travel narratives in Western Culture from the British Empire to today. Focus will be on narratives’ depictions of wilderness vs. civilization and traveling as a transformative experience.

    Prerequisite: WRI 121  or WRI 122 
  
  •  

    LIT 345 - Post-Apocalyptic Literature and Film


    (S) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Inquiry into the recent popularity of post-apocalyptic themed literature and films. Study of post-apocalyptic subgenres including natural disasters, rogue artificial intelligence, zombies, etc. and the historiocultural context from which they each have emerged.

    Prerequisite: WRI 121  or WRI 122  
  
  •  

    LIT 367 - Art and Trash in Contemporary Fiction


    (F,W) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    In-depth study of contemporary fiction, finding meaning in literature responsive to the human condition and relevant to the reader. Includes works from authors such as Margaret Atwood, Tim O’Brien, Alice Munro and Anthony Doerr.

    Prerequisite: WRI 122 
  
  •  

    LIT 373 - British Culture and Literature: Romanticism to the Present


    H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Explores features of culture and selected works and writers from the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries in Britain. Some film presentation included.

  
  •  

    LIT 381 - Contemporary World Literature


    (F,S) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    An in-depth study of selected writers and works organized thematically, geographically, and ethnically. The focus on contemporary works provides insight into current world cultures and explores globalization while encouraging students to critically examine their worldviews.

    Prerequisite: WRI 122 
  
  •  

    LIT 407 - Seminar


    H
    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

  
  •  

    LIT 456 - Topics in Film


    (F,W,S) H
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Examines films as stories using modern literary criticism techniques. Offerings include close analysis of contemporary film, selected directors, selected genres and surveys of film history.

    Prerequisites: 3 credits of English or Humanities and WRI 121 

Mathematics

  
  •  

    MATH 20 - Basic Mathematics


    Lecture Hours: 3
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 3

    Operations with whole numbers, fractions and decimals. Ratio, proportion, and percent, with applications. Calculations using length, area, and volume. Estimation and unit conversion. Credits earned apply for enrollment (eligibility), but not apply toward a degree. An additional fee is required above regular tuition.

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

  
  •  

    MATH 70 - Elementary Algebra


    (F,W)
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    For students whose preparation contains no algebra background or whose placement examination scores do not qualify for entry into Intermediate Algebra. The topics covered stress the fundamental properties of algebra, solving equations, and manipulating algebraic fractions. Credits earned apply for enrollment (eligibility) but do not apply toward a degree. An additional fee is required above regular tuition.

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

    Prerequisite: MATH 20  with grade “C” or better, or equivalent

  
  •  

    MATH 97 - Algebra Review


    (Su)
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2

    Structured review for students whose Math Placement score may not reflect an accurate evaluation or students who want a refresher but who do not require a math placement. The course has individualized directed study using a comprehensive programmed instructional technology.

    Course is graded P/W.

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

  
  •  

    MATH 100 - Intermediate Algebra


    (F,W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    Fundamentals of algebra, linear and quadratic equations, systems of equations, inequalities, functions and graphs, radicals and exponents, and stated problems. (May not be used for graduation credit.)

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

    Prerequisite: MATH 70  with grade “C” or better, or equivalent

  
  •  

    MATH 101 - Accelerated Algebra


    (F,W)
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    An accelerated algebra course with topics ranging from Elementary Algebra (MATH 70 ) to College Algebra (MATH 111 ). For entering students with good high school algebra backgrounds. All students will start in Elementary Algebra, and may receive credit for one of MATH 70 , MATH 100 , or MATH 111 , depending on individual level of achievement. An additional self-support course fee is required.

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

  
  •  

    MATH 105 - Collegiate Mathematics


    (S)
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    A variety of modern mathematical topics based on contemporary applications. Topics include combinatorics, probability, statistics, finance, matrices, and logarithmic and exponential functions. Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra with grade “C” or better.

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

  
  •  

    MATH 107 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

  
  •  

    MATH 111 - College Algebra


    (F,W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    Study of functions including graphs, operations and inverses. Includes polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic functions and their applications, and systems of equations.

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

    Prerequisite: MATH 100  with grade “C” or better, or equivalent

  
  •  

    MATH 111A - College Algebra


    (F,W)
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 2

    For students requiring MATH 111  but desiring to learn the material at a slower pace. MATH 111  content covered upon completion of MATH 111A and MATH 111B .

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

    Prerequisite: MATH 100  with grade “C” or better, or equivalent

  
  •  

    MATH 111B - College Algebra


    (W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Lab Hours: 2
    Credit Hours: 2

    For students requiring MATH 111  but desiring to learn the material at a slower pace. MATH 111  content covered upon completion of MATH 111A  and MATH 111B.

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

    Prerequisite: MATH 111A  with grade “C” or better

  
  •  

    MATH 112 - Trigonometry


    (F,W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    The trigonometric functions and their applications. Topics include graphs, identities, trigonometric equations, vectors, and complex numbers.

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

    Prerequisite: MATH 111  with grade “C” or better, or equivalent

  
  •  

    MATH 207 - Seminar


    Credit Hours: (Hours to be arranged each term.)

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

  
  •  

    MATH 211 - Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics I


    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    This is the first course in the mathematics sequence for prospective elementary teachers. Topics include problem solving strategies, set theory, numeration, computational algorithms for whole numbers and integers, estimation, relations; use is made of calculators and manipulatives.

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

    Prerequisite: MATH 100  or equivalent with grade “C” or better

  
  •  

    MATH 212 - Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics II


    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    This is the second course in the mathematics sequence for prospective elementary teachers. Topics include decimals, percents, ratios and proportions, real numbers, probability and statistics; use is made of calculators and manipulatives.

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

    Prerequisite: MATH 211  with grade “C” or better

  
  •  

    MATH 213 - Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics III


    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    This is the third course in the mathematics sequence for prospective elementary teachers and covers basic geometry. Topics include geometric shapes and their properties, measurement, congruence and similarity, and coordinate and transformational geometry; use is made of calculators and manipulatives.

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

    Prerequisite: MATH 211  with grade “C” or better

  
  •  

    MATH 221 - Introduction to Computational Software


    (W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 2

    Solve applied problems involving formulas, functions, summation and iteration using Excel and MATLAB. Use built-in functions and graphing capabilities of MATLAB and Excel. Do vector and matrix calculations and write function files using MATLAB. Write and execute macros in Excel.

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

    Prerequisite: MATH 112 

  
  •  

    MATH 243 - Introductory Statistics


    (F,W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    Descriptive statistics, numerical and graphical presentation of data, estimation and margin of error, hypothesis testing, correlation; interpretation of statistical results. Cannot be taken for graduation credit by students who have taken MATH 361 .

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

    Prerequisite: MATH 100  or instructor consent

  
  •  

    MATH 251 - Differential Calculus


    (F,W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    Theory, computational techniques and applications of the derivative.

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

    Prerequisite: MATH 112  with grade “C” or better, or equivalent

  
  •  

    MATH 252 - Integral Calculus


    (F,W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    Computational techniques for and applications of the definite and indefinite integrals.

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

    Prerequisite: MATH 251  with grade “C” or better

  
  •  

    MATH 253N - Sequences and Series


    (F,S)
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    Indeterminate forms and improper integrals. Infinite sequences and series, convergence, power series. Taylor series and applications. This course replaces MATH 254.

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

    Prerequisite: MATH 252  with grade “C” or better

  
  •  

    MATH 254N - Vector Calculus I


    (F,W,S)
    Lecture Hours: 4
    Lab Hours: 0
    Credit Hours: 4

    Vectors, vector functions, and curves in two and three dimensions. Surfaces, partial derivatives, gradients, and directional derivatives. Multiple integrals using rectangular and other coordinate systems. Physical and geometric applications.

    Note: Unless otherwise indicated with F, W, S courses will be offered as often as requested.

    Prerequisite: MATH 252  with grade “C” or better

 

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