2023-24 University Catalog 
    
    Jun 13, 2024  
2023-24 University Catalog

Humanities and Social Sciences Department


Maria Lynn Kessler, Department Chair

Kevin Garrett, Program Director, Marriage and Family Therapy
Alishia Huntoon, Program Director, Extern Coordinator and Curriculum Coordinator, Applied Psychology - Online
Maria Lynn Kessler, Program Director Applied Psychology - Portland-Metro, Program Director Applied Behavior Analysis

Trevor Petersen, Program Director, Applied Psychology - Klamath Falls

Sophie Nathenson, Program Director, Population Health Management – Portland Metro

Professors: A. Huntoon, M. Kessler, M. Neupert, R. Madden
Associate Professors: K. Chapman, D. Bailey, B. Bunting, K. Garrett, S. Nathenson, T. Petersen, Y. Rohwer
Assistant Professors:  E. Clint, C. McPheters

 

Degrees Offered

  • Master of Science
    • Applied Behavior Analysis
    • Marriage and Family Therapy
  • Bachelor of Science in:
    • Applied Psychology
    • Population Health Management

Minors Offered

  • Arts, Literature, and Philosophy (ALPs)
  • Medical Sociology
  • Psychology

Graduate Certificates Offered

  • Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA)
  • Integrated Behavioral Health & Medical Family Therapy

Module Offered

  • Oregon Transfer (OTM)

The Humanities and Social Sciences Department offers undergraduate degrees in Applied Psychology and Population Health Management, graduate degrees in Applied Behavior Analysis and Marriage and Family Therapy, minors in Arts, Literature, and Philosophy (ALPs) Medical Sociology, and Psychology and a diverse collection of courses that meet the general education requirements for all students. In addition, these classes meet the lower-division requirements for college transfer students in many pre-professional programs. Our programs work closely with community partners to provide applied learning experiences for our students.

Department Goals and Objectives

1.        To provide coursework in the humanities and social sciences in order to prepare students for employment in a rapidly changing global market.

2.        To provide course offerings in multiculturalism and globalization.

3.        To assist students in developing critical thinking and problem-solving abilities and to develop scientific knowledge and inquiry skills.

4.        To assist students in developing ethical and cultural awareness.

5.        To prepare students to be responsible citizens and lifelong learners.

6.        To assist students in developing an aesthetic appreciation of the arts.

Applied Behavior Analysis

 

Degree Offered

  • Master of Science in Applied Behavior Analysis (MS_ABA)

Certificate Offered

  • Applied Behavior Analysis Graduate Certificate

 

MS-ABA

Oregon’s first master’s degree in applied behavior analysis, the MS-ABA curriculum focuses on providing a rigorous and thorough foundation in the science of behavior analysis. Students will be prepared to apply the principles of behavior analysis with diverse populations and in a wide variety of settings. Oregon Tech’s MS-ABA prepares students to meet national certification and Oregon licensure requirements.

Courses are taught on the Klamath Falls and Portland-Metro campuses and are available to students everywhere via Zoom (a synchronous videoconferencing program). The use of Zoom technology provides an alternative to fully online, asynchronous programs for students in all areas of the state who prefer the real-time, face-to-face educational experience.

Applied Behavior Analysis

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is an evidence-based, data-driven, systematic approach to intervention. Practitioners of ABA apply principles of reinforcement and focus on applications that improve the quality of life for individuals. Behavior analysts provide services in a variety of settings including schools, clinics, rehabilitation settings, residential facilities, social service agencies, mental health facilities, businesses, and client homes. They work with diverse populations including individuals and families affected by autism, developmental and intellectual disabilities, brain injury, mental health, geriatrics, child abuse, and neglect.

Program Mission

The mission of the MS-ABA program is to enable students to become effective and ethical behavior analysts. Students will be prepared to apply principles of behavior analysis to enhance the lives of individuals across a wide variety of settings. The program emphasizes a foundation in theory, concepts, and principles, development of basic behavior analytic skills, and an emphasis on professional and ethical responsibilities. 

Program Objectives

1.        To produce competent graduates who can work effectively and ethically across settings and with diverse populations

2.        To enable students to obtain the knowledge and skills necessary for immediate employment in ABA and/or further graduate study in ABA and related areas

3.        To prepare students for national certification and Oregon licensure as behavior analysts

Program Learning Outcomes

1.        Students will understand the history and philosophy of behaviorism and basic theoretical approaches to understanding behavior.

2.        Students will demonstrate competence in understanding how principles of behavior are discovered and described in the context of basic research.

3.        Students will use technical terminology to explain and provide examples of the characteristics, concepts, principles, and processes of behavior analysis.

4.        Students will demonstrate an understanding of, and ability to conduct behavioral assessments and functional behavioral analyses (FBA), and identify strengths and limitations of assessments and FBAs.

5.        Students will demonstrate competence in the measurement of behavior, data collection, data analysis, and graphic representation.

6.        Students will demonstrate competence in single-subject research designs and will identify and describe the advantages, disadvantages, and ethical considerations of research designs.

7.        Students will critically evaluate research, analyze, and apply research findings to the practice of applied behavior analysis.

8.        Students will explain the fundamental elements of behavioral interventions including behavior change strategies, procedures and systems, including identification of scientific evidence and methods for ensuring effective implementation and maintenance of behavioral programs.

9.        Students will demonstrate an understanding of the legal constraints and ethical guidelines as pertinent to behavioral research and practice.

10.     Students will demonstrate an understanding of the roles, functions, and responsibilities of professional behavior analysts, including relationships with professional organizations, and maintaining professional credentials.

11.     Students will demonstrate the professional skills essential to developing professional and therapeutic relationships, set goals, maintain boundaries, evaluate client outcome, terminate treatment, and collaborate with other professionals.

12.     Students will demonstrate competent oral and written communication.

Licensure and Certification

MS-ABA prepares students to meet national certification and Oregon licensure requirements. The program includes the Association of Behavior Analysis-International (ABAI) verified course sequence VCS) and practicum experience that meets national certification requirements for supervised experience

BCBA course sequence: the Association for Behavior Analysis-International has verified these courses as meeting the coursework requirements for eligibility to take the Board Certified Behavior Analyst® exam. (Applicants will have to meet additional requirements to qualify)

ABA Practicum: second year practicum placements provide students with the opportunity for supervised experience. Practicum placements may be paid or unpaid positions with approved ABA agencies and, in Klamath Falls, with Oregon Tech’s BIG ABA clinic and local schools

Admissions

In order to ensure that students have the necessary preparation for success in the MS-ABA program, applicants must meet the Oregon Tech requirements for admission as well as the MS-ABA program specific requirements.

Applicants to the MS-ABA program at Oregon Tech shall meet the following requirements:

  • Bachelor’s Degree: Bachelor’s degree from an accredited four-year institution in Psychology or a related field.
  • GPA: Overall undergraduate GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale and 3.0 for the last 90 quarter credits (60 semester) credits of coursework.
  • Undergraduate Coursework: A grade of B or better in General Psychology, Research Methods, and Statistics.
  • Academic Standing: Be in good academic standing at last college or university attended.
  • Personal Statement and Resume: Applicants will be required to write a statement that addresses career goals and relevance to the program, evidence of aptitude for graduate work and evidence of potential for success in the field. 
  • Reference Letters: Applicants to the program will be required to provide three letters of reference (at least one academic and one professional) that address the applicant’s preparation, abilities, and character.
  • Background Check: Due to the sensitive nature of this program in regard to work with children and/or vulnerable populations, applicants must pass a criminal background check such as that conducted by the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS).
  • The department and university can grant conditional admission to candidates not meeting all of the minimum requirements.

Applied Behavior Analysis Graduate Certificate  


The Certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis is a 33-credit, twelve-course sequence for individuals who wish to pursue additional coursework in Applied Behavior Analysis. The Association for Behavior Analysis International has verified this course sequence as meeting the course work requirements for eligibility to take the Board Certified Behavior Analyst® exam (applicants for the BCBA® exam will have to meet additional requirements to qualify). 

Program Learning Outcomes 

Upon completion of the Certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis, students will be able to: 

1.        Explain and provide examples of basic characteristics, principles, processes, and concepts of Applied Behavior Analysis 

2.        Select, design, and use appropriate methods to measure behavior 

3.        Display and interpret behavioral data in various formats 

4.        Evaluate behavioral interventions using appropriate experimental designs 

5.        Identify and describe the advantages, disadvantages, and ethical considerations of  behavior analytic experimental designs 

6.        Read and interpret behavior analytic literature 

7.        Describe the major methods for conducting behavioral assessments and functional analyses, including strengths and limitations 

8.        Explain the fundamental elements of behavioral interventions including behavior change strategies, procedures and systems, including identification of scientific evidence 

9.        Describe methods for ensuring effective implementation and management of behavioral programs 

10.     Describe and provide examples of the ethical and professional responsibilities of behavior analysts and apply the BACB® Ethics Code for Behavior Analysts 
 

Required Courses 

ABA 511   - Foundations of ABA I Credit Hours: 3 

ABA 512   - Foundations of ABA II Credit Hours: 3 

ABA 521   - Ethics & Professional Issues I Credit Hours: 2 

ABA 522   - Ethics & Profess Issues II Credit Hours: 3 

ABA 524   – Observations and Measures Credit Hours: 2 

ABA 525   - Research Methods in ABA Credit Hours: 3 

ABA 526   - Behavioral Assessment I Credit Hours: 3 

ABA 527   – Radical Behaviorism Credit Hours: 3 

ABA 531   - Behavior Change I: Decreasing Challenging Behavior Credit Hours: 3 

ABA 532   – Behavior Change II: Increasing & Maintaining Behavior Credit Hours: 3 

ABA 546   – Behavioral Assessment II Credit Hours: 2 

ABA 547   – Supervision & Personnel Management Credit Hours: 3 

Marriage and Family Therapy

 

Degree Offered

  • Master of Science in Marriage and Family Therapy (MS MFT)

Program Overview

The MFT Program at Oregon Tech is a full-time mental health graduate program with specialized training in systems, families, and relationships. Students are admitted to the program to begin coursework each fall. The MFT Program takes 2.75 years to successfully complete; part-time opportunities are available upon request. A year-long practicum experience begins in June between years two and three of the program. Courses are offered nights, weekends, and days in a variety of modalities, including: face-to-face in person, face-to-face via video conferencing, blended;,and fully online. 

Rural Mental Health Care: Mental health care needs in rural areas, like southern Oregon, provide unique challenges that require unique approaches. MFT students develop the expertise and skills required to excel as rural mental health care providers.
 

Integrated Behavioral Healthcare and Medical Family Therapy: Medical health and mental health often influence one another. These not only affect the patient, but the patient’s partner and family system as well. The MFT Program has embedded Integrated Behavioral Healthcare and Medical Family Therapy courses into the curriculum to help graduates develop the knowledge and skills required to become indispensable leaders in medical family therapy, who often work in medical settings and work closely and collaboratively with medical personnel. Those who graduate from the MS MFT Program earn a Graduate Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Healthcare and Medical Family Therapy.

Substance Use, Addiction, and Recovery: Mental health and addiction frequently co-exist. The MFT Program has integrated addiction courses into the curriculum in an effort to graduate competent trauma-informed, systemic clinicians with a strong foundation in addiction and recovery.

Program Mission Statement

Oregon Tech’s Master of Science in Marriage and Family Therapy (MS-MFT) program prepares graduates to become skilled Marriage and Family Therapists with multicultural competence, expertise in rural mental health care, medical family therapy and substance use disorders and addictions treatment.

In strong collaboration with local child and family service organizations, health care and mental health care providers, the MS MFT program supports and strengthens mental health care and child and family services in the under-served rural areas that are in southern Oregon.

Program Objectives

1.      Teach foundational knowledge related to human development, basic counseling skills, MFT theories and interventions, assessment and diagnosing, cultural humility, rural mental health care, and research.

2.      Train trauma-informed and culturally competent marriage and family therapists.

3.      Teach the integration of mental health and addiction and recovery in the etiology and treatment of co-occurring disorders.

4.      Train marriage and family therapists in Integrated Behavioral Healthcare and Medical Family Therapy practices.

5.      Increase awareness of issues of diversity, inclusion and social justice for the delivery of culturally-responsive and culturally-sensitive family therapy.

6.      Promote the importance of ethical principles while upholding ethical standards that are consistent with the AAMFT Code of Ethics and the ACA Code of Ethics.

Program Learning Outcomes

1.        Theoretical Knowledge
Competency: Apply principles and constructs of various human development and systems theories to marriage and family practice.

2.        Clinical Knowledge
Competency: Apply family therapy skills and techniques to assess, structure and direct therapy, help clients to find solutions, identify strengths, and stay engaged in the therapeutic process.

3.        Professional Identity and Ethics
Competency: Develop professional identity consistent with professional attitudes and behaviors outlined in the AAMFT Code of Ethics and applicable laws and regulations, with particular attention to cultural competence.

4.        Cultural Competency
Competency: Demonstrate knowledge about systemically and culturally contextualized experiences of members of socio-cultural majority and minority groups, integrating that knowledge into ethical practice as marriage and family therapists.

5.        Research
Competency: Analyze research and translate research findings for improvement of family therapy services using statistics and program evaluation methods.

6.        Interpersonal Effectiveness
Competency: Achieve personal development and demonstrate positive relationship skills via effective communication, respect for others, and awareness of their impact on others.

Licensure and Credentialing

The Oregon Tech MS- MFT Program has a comprehensive curriculum, approved by the Oregon Board of Licensed Professional Counselors and Therapists. Graduates will meet curriculum requirements for licensing as Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists in the state of Oregon.

The MFT Program curriculum is designed to meet COAMFTE requirements.

The certification of alcohol and drug counselors in the state of Oregon is overseen by the Mental Health and Addiction Certification Board of Oregon (MHACBO). Graduates of the MFT Program at Oregon Tech will meet the educational requirements for credentialing as Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselors III (CADC III).

Career Opportunities

MFT’s are trained in both psychotherapy and in family systems, which allows them to focus on understanding client symptoms in the context of the relational interactions that influence behavior. Family-based therapy is a powerful model for change. Research has shown that family-based interventions such as those utilized by MFTs are as effective as–and in many cases more effective than–alternative therapies, often at a lower cost. MFTs apply a holistic perspective to health care; they are concerned with the overall, long-term well-being of individuals and their families. Whoever the client, MFTs view problems from a relationship perspective. Settings in which MFT’s become employed include, but are not limited to:

  • Community mental health centers/agencies
  • Child and family service agencies
  • Private practice
  • Religious and spiritual organizations
  • Hospitals and medical settings
  • School-based therapy settings
  • Veterans services facilities
  • Residential treatment facilities
  • Addiction and recovery services

Admission

To ensure that students have the necessary preparation for success in the MS-MFT program, applicants must meet the Oregon Tech requirements for admission as well as the MS-MFT program specific requirements.

Applicants to the MS-MFT program at Oregon Tech shall meet the following requirements:

  • Bachelor’s Degree: Bachelor’s degree from an accredited four-year institution in Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Human Development, Family Studies, or related field.
  • GPA: Overall undergraduate GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale and 3.0 for the last 90 quarter credits (60 semester) credits of coursework.
  • Recommended undergraduate Coursework: A grade of B or better in Introduction to Psychology or Sociology, Research Methods, and Human Sexuality.
  • Academic Standing: Be in good academic standing at last college or university attended.
  • GRE Scores – GRE scores over five years old are not accepted.
  • Personal Statement and Resume: Applicants will be required to write a statement that addresses career goals and relevance to the program, evidence of aptitude for graduate work and evidence of potential for success in the field. 
  • Reference Letters: Applicants to the program will be required to provide three letters of reference (at least one academic and one professional) that address the applicant’s preparation, abilities, and character. Reference letters should not be written by family or close friends.
  • Updated resume
  • Background Check: Due to the sensitive nature of this program in regard to work with children, families, and/or vulnerable populations, applicants must pass a criminal background check after admission to the program.
  • The department and university can grant conditional admission to candidates not meeting the minimum requirements.

Integrated Behavioral Healthcare & Medical Family Therapy  Graduate Certificate  

  • Integrated Behavioral Healthcare & Medical Family Therapy Graduate Certificate is the only graduate certificate of its kind offered in the State of Oregon, the Graduate Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Healthcare & Medical Family Therapy at Oregon Tech will help meet the growing demand for qualified mental health professionals who are well-trained to work in integrated care settings, thus making students marketable and sought after, in addition to helping fill the need for health care professionals in southern Oregon and other underserved areas of the nation.

    The Graduate Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Healthcare & Medical Family Therapy is embedded within the M.S. Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) Program’s curriculum. The Graduate Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Healthcare & Medical Family Therapy is a 12-credit, four-course sequence that trains Oregon Tech’s MS MFT students to specifically work within an integrated behavioral health model.

    Titles given to those with this specialized training are “Behavioral Health Clinician,” “Behavioral Health Practitioner,” “Integrated Behavioral Health Therapist,” or “Medical Family Therapist.” Those with this certificate will typically work in integrative healthcare or collaborative healthcare settings, wherein they collaborate closely with primary care and medical providers, as well as other helping disciplines, to help patients and their families. They typically work in hospitals, doctors’ offices, other medical settings, private practice offices, and community mental health agencies.

    Students who complete the necessary coursework within the M.S. MFT Program at Oregon Tech, which means earning a grade of “A” or “B” in each course, will earn the Graduate Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Healthcare & Medical Family Therapy.

Program Learning Outcomes 

Upon completion of the Graduate Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Healthcare and Medical Family Therapy, students will be able to: 

1.        Describe the multiple professional roles and functions of counselors across specialty areas, and their relationships with human service and integrated behavioral healthcare systems, including interagency and inter-organizational collaboration and consultation 

2.        Describe the roles and functions unique to Rural Mental Healthcare 

3.        Describe the roles and functions unique to Medical Family Therapy 

4.        Understand, describe, and apply biopsychosocial-spiritual approaches to healthcare.      

5.        Understand and describe how to work collaboratively as members of holistic medical teams, including how to refer, document, and communicate with healthcare professionals. 

6.        Understand and describe the bidirectional relationship between health and wellness on mental health functioning. 

7.        Demonstrate knowledge of the demands and needs of patients and families affected by acute and chronic illness. 

8.        Describe how working with families around their cultural and illness beliefs can help them. 

9.        Describe how therapeutic interventions can be informed by the family’s developmental stage and the illness’s psychosocial typology. 

10.        Articulate how cultural considerations must be practiced with patients and their families. 

11.        Understand and describe how the care of patients and families affected by acute and chronic illness impacts mental health and medical providers. 

12.        Describe how students’ own experiences with health and illness may affect their clinical work. 

13.        Understand and describe how to facilitate communication between patients, families, and healthcare providers and invite coordination of services. 

14.        Identify the obstacles faced by individual and families residing in rural communities who require treatment for substance use and co-occurring disorders. 

15.     Explain the roles of Medical Family Therapists and Behavioral Health Clinicians in integrated SUDs treatment. 

16.     Articulate the professional ethics and standards of practice that apply to the systemic treatment of patients in medical settings, and in addiction and recovery in underserved rural communities. 

Applied Psychology

 

Degree Offered

  • Bachelor of Science in Applied Psychology

The Bachelor of Science in Applied Psychology prepares students for careers that apply the principles of psychology in diverse settings. The program provides a strong core curriculum in order for students to understand the foundations, theories, and principles of each area of psychology. As an applied program, both core and elective courses have a skills-based focus, allowing students to identify personal strengths, apply knowledge to real-world situations, create and implement new ideas, and ultimately be prepared to enter the workforce or continue on to graduate programs. A diverse offering of elective courses allows for students to focus on one or many areas of psychology, creating a unique opportunity for students to have an in-depth and personalized psychology degree. Students should consult with their advisor about specific interests for guidance regarding elective offerings. The Applied Psychology program also offers Capstone in Applied Psychology (CAP) courses. These CAP courses vary by term and give senior students the opportunity to synthesize knowledge learned throughout the degree program and apply core principles and theories of psychology to a selected topic. Through an Applied Experience, students have the opportunity to participate in externships, advanced research courses, or community work to prepare themselves for exciting and rewarding careers in psychology or for additional course work in graduate programs.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Applied Psychology Program is to enable students to apply core principles and theories of psychology and in-depth knowledge and skills in specific areas of psychology to communicate effectively, think critically, behave ethically and with cultural awareness, and work inter-personally with people from a wide variety of backgrounds.

Career Opportunities

Nationwide, college graduates with a bachelor’s in psychology perform a wide variety of jobs or attend a wide variety of graduate programs. Graduates may work in counseling, education, social service, management, public relations, public health, and other fields. All of these jobs are potentially available to graduates of Oregon Tech’s Applied Psychology Program. Many of Oregon Tech’s Applied Psychology graduates have found jobs in Oregon and beyond. Human service employers include county and state agencies, as well as a wide range of private and non-profit agencies. Graduates of Oregon Tech’s Applied Psychology Program benefit from the emphasis of hands-on training and applied experiences. Graduates have been employed in industry and are following management training programs. Graduates have also pursued various master’s and doctoral programs in psychology, Counseling, social work, education, and related fields.

 

Program Educational Objectives

The educational objectives of the Applied Psychology program are:

  • To produce graduates with effective interpersonal skills who can work in a variety of practical settings.
  • To enable students to obtain the knowledge and skills necessary for immediate employment and/or graduate study in psychology and related areas.
  • To provide opportunities for students who wish to apply psychology training to employment in business and human service related organizations or to prepare for graduate programs in related areas.
  • To serve as a minor to complement other programs on campus.

Program Learning Outcomes

1.        Students will demonstrate an understanding of and be able to use major research methodologies in psychology, including design, data analysis, and interpretation

2.        Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of relevant ethical issues including a general understanding of the APA Code of Ethics.

3.        Students will demonstrate basic counseling.

4.        Students will demonstrate effective writing conventions by using APA style effectively in empirically based reports, literature reviews and theoretical papers.

5.        Students will demonstrate effective oral communication skills in various formats (e.g. group discussion, debate and lecture).

Population Health Management

Degree Offered

  • Bachelor of Science in Population Health Management

The Population Health Management (PHM) professions are complementary to clinical health care. Population Health Management is the field of translating health date into actionable programs and policies that improve the health of a group of people. The PHM B.S. degree program includes core courses in medical sociology, population health, applied psychology, management, mathematics, communication, and health sciences. Students may choose one of three emphases: Health Counseling/Outreach, Care Management and Coordination, and Applied Health Data Analytics.

The PHM program begins with a foundation in sociological theory, methods and research.

PHM graduates will gain competence in social theory, research methods, statistics, program planning and evaluation, and training in working with diverse and under-served populations.

Mission Statement

The mission of the PHM program is to provide students with the best possible training for careers that improve health and well-being. As the United States health care system changes to adapt to a new demographic and health landscape, increasing emphasis is placed on preventative medicine and health maintenance. PHM graduates will help fill this pressing need, providing much needed health resources to hospitals, schools, governmental and non-profit organizations, and local communities. Such work empowers individuals through health programs and policy, to create a healthier future for our nation.

Career Opportunities

Students who graduate from the PHM program may work in a wide variety of settings, all with the intent of improving the health and well-being of individuals and communities. Careers include health coaching, health research, community health program and evaluation, education, and patient advocacy. The PHM degree is an ideal preparation for graduate study in sociology, epidemiology, public health and medicine.

Program Learning Outcomes

1.        Students will demonstrate knowledge of basic theoretical frameworks of sociology and demonstrate an ability to apply social theory to behavioral trends.

2.        Students will demonstrate understanding of the impact of such factors as culture, ethnicity, nationality, age, gender, sexual orientation, mental and physical characteristics, family values, education, religious and spiritual values, and socio-economics status on the health and wellbeing of individuals; students will demonstrate cultural competency.

3.        Students will demonstrate an understanding of the sociological research method, including an ability to organize, analyze, and present data.

4.        Students will demonstrate an understanding of the roles, functions, and responsibilities of healthcare professionals and patients, including alternative approaches to healthcare.

5.        Students will demonstrate an understanding of health behavior change and the ability to practice techniques to assist others with health-seeking behavior changes.

Oregon Transfer Module (OTM)

The Oregon Transfer Module (OTM) provides a one-year curriculum for students who plan to transfer to a State of Oregon community college or university. The module allows students to complete one year of general education foundation course work that is academically sound and will meet the admission standards of the receiving school. Students should work closely with an academic advisor to ensure selection of appropriate course work. Upon transfer, students may be required to complete additional course work in general education or an academic major specific to the receiving institution. Students who transfer prior to the completion of the Oregon Transfer Module will have their courses individually evaluated by the receiving institution. Students must complete a minimum of 45 credits of lower division course work with a grade of “C-” or better in order to receive credit for the Oregon Transfer Module. A minimum of 12 credits must be earned at Oregon Tech. The following courses may be used to complete the Oregon Transfer Module:

FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS

Writing and Oral Communication

Writing

  • Two courses of college level composition

Oral Communication

  • One course of Public Speaking or Communication

Mathematics

  • One course of College level Math

INTRODUCTION TO DISCIPLINES

Arts and Letters/Humanities

  • 3 courses of Arts and letters/Humanities
  • Oregon Tech only allows 3 credits of performance or studio-based courses in this category

Science/Math/Computer Science

  • 3 courses, including at least one biological or physical science with a laboratory

Social Science

  • 3 courses of Social Science

Arts, Literature, and Philosophy (ALPs) Minor

The ALPs minor may be completed by students from any major and is especially recommended to students who want an opportunity to take a secondary focus in the Humanities during their time at Oregon Tech. This secondary focus will give them an opportunity to further explore their passions in the fields of Arts, Literature, and Philosophy while receiving official recognition of their newly-acquired expertise. The minor will give students the ability to take more Humanities classes that are relevant to their major program and their future career goals while instilling in them the knowledge and values associated with a traditional liberal arts education.

The minor requires 18 credit hours, including one of the required courses listed below (3 credits). The remaining courses must be chosen from the following prefixes: ART, HUM, LIT, PHIL. At least 12 of these 15 credit hours must be upper division courses. Transfer students must take at least 9 hours of their minor credits at Oregon Tech to qualify.

 

Requirements of the Minor

Required Courses

(3 credits, one from this set is required, but others can be counted toward electives, below):

HUM 105 - EAC: Text, Images, Games Credit Hours: 3

HUM 125 - Intro Tech, Soc, Value Credit Hours: 3

HUM 147 - West Cult in the Classical Age Credit Hours: 3 (f/k/a Introduction to Humanities I)

HUM 148 - West Cult in the Medieval Age Credit Hours: 3 (f/k/a Introduction to Humanities II)

HUM 149 - West Cult in the Modern Age Credit Hours: 3 (f/k/a Introduction to Humanities III)

LIT 253 - 19th Century American Lit Credit Hours: 3 (f/k/a American Literature I)

LIT 254 - 20th Century American Lit Credit Hours: 3 (f/k/a American Literature II)

LIT 255 - Contemporary American Lit Credit Hours: 3 (f/k/a American Literature III)

PHIL 105 - Introduction to Ethics Credit Hours: 3

PHIL 205 - Introduction to Logic Credit Hours: 3

 

Electives

(15 credits, at least 12 upper division):

ART 205 - Introduction to Watercolors Credit Hours: 3

ART 210 - Beginning Sculpture Credit Hours: 3

ART 220 - Basic Drawing Credit Hours: 3

ART 226 - Digital Photography Credit Hours: 3

ART 280 - Introductory Painting Credit Hours: 3

ART 282 - Intro to Acrylic Painting Credit Hours: 3

HUM 105 - EAC: Text, Images, Games Credit Hours: 3

HUM 125 - Intro Tech, Soc, Value Credit Hours: 3

HUM 147 - West Cult in the Classical Age Credit Hours: 3 (f/k/a Introduction to Humanities I)

HUM 148 - West Cult in the Medieval Age Credit Hours: 3 (f/k/a Introduction to Humanities II)

HUM 149 - West Cult in the Modern Age Credit Hours: 3 (f/k/a Introduction to Humanities III)

HUM 235 - Introduction to Film Credit Hours: 4

HUM 345 - Digital Culture and Society Credit Hours: 3

HUM 335 - Video Game Studies Credit Hours: 3

LIT 104 - Intro to Literature Credit Hours: 3

LIT 105 - Intro to Literature Credit Hours: 3

LIT 106 - Intro to Literature Credit Hours: 3

HUM 225 - Cont Thter: Ashland Plays Credit Hours: 3

LIT 235 - American Multicultural Lit Credit Hours: 3

LIT 253 - 19th Century American Lit Credit Hours: 3 (f/k/a American Literature I)

LIT 254 - 20th Century American Lit Credit Hours: 3 (f/k/a American Literature II)

LIT 255 - Contemporary American Lit Credit Hours: 3 (f/k/a American Literature III)

LIT 266 - Native American Lit & Film Credit Hours: 3

LIT 305 - Ecol Issues in Nature Writing Credit Hours: 3

LIT 315 - Science Fiction Lit & Flim Credit Hours: 3

LIT 325 - The Metropolis Credit Hours: 3

LIT 335 - Travel Lit: Fiction & Nonfict Credit Hours: 3

LIT 345 - Postapocalyptic Lit & Film Credit Hours: 3

LIT 367 - Art & Trash in Contemp Fiction Credit Hours: 3

LIT 373 - British Culture & Literature Credit Hours: 3

LIT 381 - Contemporary World Lit Credit Hours: 3

LIT 456 - Topics in Film Credit Hours: 3

PHIL 105 - Introduction to Ethics Credit Hours: 3

PHIL 205 - Introduction to Logic Credit Hours: 3

PHIL 215 - Ethical Theory Credit Hours: 3

PHIL 305 - Medical Ethics Credit Hours: 3

PHIL 315 - The Ethics of Emerging Tech Credit Hours: 3

PHIL 325 - Environmental Ethics Credit Hours: 3

PHIL 331 - Ethics in the Professions Credit Hours: 3

PHIL 335 - Philosophy of Science Credit Hours: 3

PHIL 342 - Business Ethics Credit Hours: 3

PHIL 405 - Advanced Logic Credit Hours: 3

Medical Sociology Minor

The Department of Humanities and Social Sciences offers a Medical Sociology Minor as a supplement to the Oregon Tech technical and applied degrees related to health, health care, management and social science. The minor offers courses covering the central topics of medical sociology, including the social factors in health and illness, the patient experience of illness, the role of health care professionals, and the interaction between health and society.

The Medical Sociology Minor is designed with the current employer demands and changes in health care organization in mind. Many employers within the health care field seek employees who are culturally competent, prepared to work with diverse populations, and are familiar with social determinants of health.

A minimum of 21 credits is required to complete the minor. Enrollment in the minor is through the Humanities and Social Sciences Department; contact the department chair or your advisor for more information.

 

Required Courses

SOC 204 - Intro to Sociology Credit Hours: 3 a

SOC 225 - Medical Sociology Credit Hours: 3

SOC 325 - Global Population Health Credit Hours: 3

OR

SOC 305 - Rural Health Credit Hours: 3

SOC 335 - Hlth Inequal & Cult Competency Credit Hours: 3

 

Choose three courses from the following:

Two of the three courses must be 300 or 400 level.

Lower Division

PHM 105 - Intro to Population Health Management Credit Hours: 3

SOC 205 - Curent Health Issues Credit Hours: 3

SOC 206 - Social Problems Credit Hours: 3

HIST 275 - History of Medicine Credit Hours: 3

 

Upper Division

BUS 316 - Total Quality Health Care Credit Hours: 3

PHIL 305 - Medical Ethics Credit Hours: 3

PHM 321 - Community Program Planning Credit Hours: 3

PHM 435 - Research Center Credit Hours: 3

SOC 305 - Rural Health Credit Hours: 3

SOC 345 - Aging and Society Credit Hours: 3

STAT 414 - Stat Methods in Epidemiology Credit Hours: 4

SOC 307 - Seminar Credit Hours: 3 will be considered as electives pending program director approval.

SOC 407 - Seminar Credit Hours: 3 will be considered as electives pending program director approval.

or

PSY 307 - Seminar Credit Hours: 3 will be considered as electives pending program director approval.

PSY 407 - Seminar Credit Hours: 3 will be considered as electives pending program director approval.

 

Psychology Minor

The psychology minor is open to all majors and is especially recommended for students majoring in allied health and medical sciences, management, and communication studies. The minor offers a variety of courses in psychology that can enhance knowledge. A minimum of 24 credits is required to complete the minor. Students should meet with a psychology advisor when choosing electives to fulfill the minor requirements. Enrollment in the minor is through the Humanities and Social Sciences Department; contact the department chair or your advisor for more information.

Requirements of the Minor

A minimum of 24 credits is required to earn the minor.

A minimum of 12 credits must be selected from upper-division coursework. Students must pay strict attention to prerequisite requirements.

 

Courses Required lower division courses (9 credits):

PSY 201 - Psychology 

PSY 202 - Psychology

PSY 203 – Psychology


Additional Courses:

12 credits of upper division psychology courses

3 credits of lower or upper division courses

 

For all courses counted toward the Minor in Psychology, a letter grade of “C” or better is required to be awarded the minor.

At least 12 credits of courses in this minor must be completed at Oregon Tech.

 

Note: Not all courses are offered every term or every year.

 

Programs

    Major
    Minor
    Certificate